Can Small Businesses Survive Facebook’s New Policy? / by Demiana Marie

If you plan to revamp your brand’s social media strategy in the New Year, you may want to spend extra time rethinking how you approach Facebook. Beginning January 2015, the social media network vows to limit the amount of promotional posts that populates in News Feeds, making it tougher for brands to organically spread their message amongst those that already like and follow their page. 

In an effort to ease worries about Timelines and News Feeds being overrun by low-quality promo posts not relevant to users (and as a way to increase ad spending by business pages), Facebook will weed out posts from pages that are overly promotional and lacking substance. In an article featured on their blog, Facebook explains how they surveyed “hundreds of thousands of people” and found that the greatest News Feed critiques were often about posts that solely push people to buy a product or install an app, posts that ask users to enter promotions and sweepstakes with no real context and posts that reuse the same content from ads.

Images from businesses  that are low-quality and purely promotional will show up less frequently in News Feeds beginning January 2015.

Images from businesses  that are low-quality and purely promotional will show up less frequently in News Feeds beginning January 2015.

 For small businesses that rely heavily on Facebook for social media marketing, Facebook still suggests posting consistently, targeting posts to a specific audience and using fresh images and text to increase engagement. While Facebook’s goal for the user may be to improve the quality of posts that populate in Feeds, the goal for businesses is to encourage brands to boost posts and to purchase ads when promoting deals, contests and campaigns. Small businesses with small marketing budgets can still operate within the new guidelines without spending, but getting the right content in front of the right audience will come at a price. Read more about the new policy here.   

What do you think small businesses can do to succeed with Facebook’s new policy?